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to the center for american progress. higher education is the topic. they are talking about higher education and american competitiveness. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we are live at the center for american progress with gene sperling and drew faust. there are looking at out education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. this is getting started a little later appeared things in d.c. are little slower because of the fog. while we wait, some of the programming coming up are under way. we're airing to live discussions on voting in the 2012 election. panelists are looking at whether it will affect immigration policy. immigration works is hosting that discussion. it got under way at 9:00 eastern. another hour to go. a daylong conference on the voter experience in 2012 with representatives from google, microsoft, and twitter. other topics include a voter i.d. laws and some of the long lines in georgia by voters. it will go on all day on c-span 3. the center for american progress is hosting this discussio
," human rights education program on the occasion of the 2012 international human rights day. offered by commissioners murase and mendoza. >> is there a motion? >> so moved. >> second. >> reading of the resolution by commissioner murase or mendoza. >> whereas san francisco became the birth place of the united nations with the signing of the u.n. charter at the war memorial veterans building in 1945 and annually december 10th marks international human rights day to celebrate the universal declaration of human rights, the first achievement. united nations. and whereas the san francisco-based foundation founded by the legendary rock band the grateful dead has advanced education about the universal declaration of human rights among youth and adults called the world it's could be." and whereas by delivering human rights curriculum to the creative arts the groundbreaking curriculum is designed to engage youth, inspire learning and critical thinking and positive social interaction, encourage youth who are often marginalized due to learning or physical differences to enjoy participation
. indian education program native-american month a day of'j>]cc recognition for the significant contribution, the first americans made to the establishment and growth of the united states, has evolved to become a whole month being designated for that#;?j+7qñ purpose, and whereas during the month of november, we'd like to1& american indian staff in the unified school district for maintaining pride and academic u title 7 and community partners that support cultural pride of the american indian, and in particular the'zw[csu supports the academicqñq>wñ needs of the american indian alaskan students, culturalpúi awareness, family literacy hands on learning nights college preparedness, leadership ei-opportunities a summer science program[me teachers that focus on a youth p.o.w. wow. ask the commissioner fewer to read the rest. >> commissioner fewer: whereas the parent advisory committee of the indian education program consists of parentsñ?ñ?ñ aides representatives, teachers administration and community members to -
treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
the next year. we plan to have quarterly meetings and have them include educational component to help dwns the mutual knowledge and guide the work and continue to have robust exchanges among ourselves and the key agencies and cal-ema and fema and others providing resources post disaster so thank you. >> thank you very much. that was very informative. thank you. i would like to ask now john boseman to come join me who is the government affairs manager for boma and the mayor mentioned it early ye today. i think john has a one minute film he's going to show and he's also going to be -- as you know in each of the agenda's we ask a community partner to come up and do a brief presentation so we know what they're up to so john i turn it over to you. >> thank you. i appreciate it. happy friday afternoon. it's an honor to be here with so many distinguished city leaders. i am humbled and admiral thank you for your good work. it's an honor to be in the same room. who knows what this is? good. that sames me time. i'm here to talk about the importance of this room and building and the good wo
towards core standards. i would argue that is for the destruction of education. it's not the advance of students of san francisco and the students of this country. core standards are being used not to provide more teaching, more education, but to drive more testing and to drive really the students out and further privatization of the school. another issue was a video done of this incident at the school. there was a video done of the physical abuse of the student at the school and apparently amos brown was able to see that video. who allowed him to see that video, since he is not a parent of the student? is this allowed? other people have asked to see the have and not been provided that opportunity. there are serious and systematic problems going on and it has to be addressed. if this is slander, it's absolutely untrue and i think the superintendent should apologize to the people, the parents and students at mlk. thank you. >> good evening everyone. my name was in the paper for -- i will just quote it, "she yelled at me in front of two classes of students," said linda cook a forme
education and retirement. >> on the tax side, as part of the adults of a solution, to you think the gap between the way work is tax and investment and capital gains are taxed -- does that have to narrow as part of the final solution? >> i think so. capital gains going up 20%, some people suggest even more. that is something we should look at. there is concern about that. the differential is one of the reasons why will the americans pay so little. ann romney be one of them. it is not really fair. he thought it was -- mitt romney being one of the imperious -- to being one of them. >> on the other side of the leisure, they never released a math and with a scribbled all of the house -- on the other side of the ledger him, they never released a nafta and where they scribbled on of the ideas. we have had an election. shut those two ideas still be on the table the that the president -- should those two idea still be on the table when the president and the speaker are in the room together? >> it doesn't have to be done right now. it is not as much risk. we should deal with it and we should. whe
, our focus has been on educating the public on public policy. and fostering the future leaders from our minority communities to serve at federal, state, and local levels. the mission is to empower patients and pacific islander americans in civic and public affairs to education, active participation, and leadership development. >> civic engagement, leadership development, and community servthe theme of tonight's evens a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of asian-americans in the state of california and our nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san francisco's future. a great job, especially for helping out families. we want to keep families here. i also wanted to mention a little bit of his past. he was born in 1952 in the beacon hill neighborhood of seattle, washington.
attendance. simply put it informs us how much funds we have to spend on animal care, conservation, education, facility support as we go through the fiscal year. the same is also true for members, supporting conservation and education programs. don't forget the donors. they restrict projects to certain projects and animals. the funds from attendance and membership that supports mainly the facility, thank you. with that, speaking of attendance, i'm going to go to the slide show here. we are thankful local groups help raise the awareness of the zoo. as i speak hockey players from the san francisco bulls are actually at the zoo this morning. they are passing out icy fish pucks to the bears and helping us kick off the winter programs. there is something appropriate about bulls visiting a zoo. part of our programming, santa's favorite have arrived. think of peppermint, bell, holly and velvet, to help teach the children about north america conservation. another thing we do is we delivered ten tons of snow for our polar bears. our polar bears are ulu and pica. i have a picture, there we go. there's
leisure time, save for retirement, and pay for education so they can grow up earning more than their parents. this. the weekend the american economy is not creating any jobs of any kind -- enough jobs of any kind. to many americans cannot have the skills they need. the path to a prosperous middle class is a combination of a vibrant economy that creates and positive role. federal policies on the national debt, taxes and regulations, allclass job creation. opening and growing a business. they are afraid of getting hit with a massive tax increase to pay off this debt. one of the leading causes of our growing future debt is the way medicare is currently designs for the future -- designed for the future. the sooner we act, the likelier we can do it without making any currently in the system, like paul ryan's and my mother. a complicated tax code is also hampering the creation of jobs. you cannot open a business if uncertain. that is allied i oppose the present's plans to raise taxes the -- that is why i oppose the dent in the debt. over half of the private sector workers and america
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
that are kind of active in your life. so, i hope that this kind of education that will help people who are victims of violence, actually recognize that they are being exploited that they are in violent situations and it will give them the courage to kind of move out of those situation buzz but what i have found is people who are from the working class and are strained and unemployed, don't have the means to leave abusive situations. president chu made sure that more money goes into this and it is long overdue and so if the experience of me, the experience of the level of discourse around the issue of domestic violence has increased this past year, and then, that is a good thing. you know? and i am glad that more money and more attention is being given to this. i hope that in the future we see more women of color associated with this issue, today i don't see any. there are not any here, aliana lopez had a different perspective she was never brought into the conversation as somebody who was part of the conversation should never have bought into the conversation. and so hopefully, that o
findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education innovator, sal khan, on a mission to bring a free world class education to anyone, anywhere. >> it's really about the student taking ownership of their own learning. >> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end.
. this will improve education for our children. why are you giving it a big f. >> there is no relationship between test scores and the amount of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that is the teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better out come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we hav
our system and say that is the foundation for higher education for those who will be innovators in the future. the harvard business school last your did a competitiveness survey. they found higher education institutions or america's greatest asset. they found one of the highest concerns of the many leaders in business that they serve it was the state of k-12 education which was seen as a huge disadvantage in american competitiveness. students who are coming to college, 43% are not ready for college in one field or another. universities need to do considerable remedial work before they can even start the students on the treasury to what a college education should be. how do we begin to address the challenges that this has had a number of exciting innovations? they are trying to in able research, uniting that with business school faculty that shows how you lead an organization like a school district or school. and what they can add to train educational leaders who can transform systems. this has been a popular degree. it has wonderful candidates who go through its. this is just on
a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to pr
the graduation requirements that were established by the san francisco board of education. we, in san francisco, have seen tremendous economic growth coming out of the most severe recession since the great depression, and having served on regional bodies that include other jurisdictions, i can tell you that we are very lucky in san francisco, that we are lucky that we have the resources that we have had, and that we hopefully will continue to have. but, yetd yet, in a city as wealthy as san francisco we have a school district that is facing a crisis. we have about half of our students in this class of 2014 that may not be able to graduate and meet the requirements. san francisco has to do better than that. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i wi
xhd[udd. but it is happening to martin luther king school. so we are taking up the campaign to educate public -- forpj5!t"de district attorneyt÷ñ?ñ? gascÓn e action on this. thank you. >> good evening. i've been here before. i saw -- 1971 so as a 40-plus year employee ixyñ?ñ? am now fig a dismissal charge -- >> hold on a seconds. state your name. >> my name is toby caine. and like÷cñ?ñ? i say, i'm fighta dismissal charge for a incident that i had at mlk. i was part of a situation where the principal was instrumental to have surgery. i was out. modified work position, untrained, and harassed because i couldn't do all the things that needed to be done. but that's -- my point is that there -- they're trying to dismiss me simply because i had a blowout with the principal. and all the narratives that i've written and given to have been changed aro[b]p!ir like that i am the culprit. both times i asked for a police report. i was never supported. where are my!Ññ?ñ rights. i have no rights. once i started complaining to represented, you know, or given having problems with the administration and i hadn
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
and counseling, an in-house attorney, assistance in finding a job. the agency also provides education in the community to prevent abuse -- further abuse, and we often think that it doesn't exist and yet this organization is making clear that the prevalence of domestic violence is known and combatted. each year safe home helps thousands of women and children reestablish their lives without violence. the employees and volunteers there are making that difference that is so important in the lives of so many. after my visit to safe home, a kansan post add question on my facebook wall. mr. bachmann said, if i came away from my safe home visit with any honest sense of how the current political game played in washington and the proposed legislation compromised not only works -- not only the work of safe home does but also aggravates the conditions that breed and sustain violence and hostility against women. the question was, do we know what our failures in washington, d.c., actually cause in the lives of folks across my state and around the country? the point this constituent makes is right o
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game.
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
a potential customer's attention long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to
future, our future, the future of the city. we was discussing education in item 13, and i feel that ifl( don't fire up every channel if we don't liquidate every pipeline and search every avenue[vjld in! >> president chiu: excuse me, sir. we have a rule in the board chamber that issues that have already been discussed in committee can't be discussed in public comment today. that being said if you want to discuss education issues in general you're free to do that. >> yeah. i feel like the children that's in schoolútpÑ now they're going to be sitting in these seats, the same children so if we don't get on top of this education crisis, we're basically"wp(g÷ contributing to the demise of our own future and the future of this city. so i think that it's important that we do have the conversation about education as often as we possibly can, not just when it's time to fork over some money to the school district. i feel like we need to hold them more accountable the community, and city government. and i think we always need
is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
-creates with their own experiences. the process of mourning, which is not just formal school education, but interactions with her parents about the whole world is a very important part of the development of intelligence. you could do a perfect job of re-creating the neo cortex and i wouldn't do anything useful, just like a newborn is limited in scale without an education. in fact, that's an important paradigm for the a.i., artificial intelligence is to them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neo cortex is as opposed to the blame? >> guest: gets old brain and the neighboring. only mammals have the neo cortex. early mammals emerged over 100 million years ago. the neo cortex is the size of a postage stamp. it's as thin as stamp and basically the outer layer, the new ryan of the brain. it's capable of thinking is hierarchical fashion. >> host: that the part of the brain you are focusing on? >> guest: these early mammals was limited, but enabled them to learn no schools -- new skills. but they were able to adapt. that was not so much of an advantage because the environment to change quickly. it took tho
to have a video. >> my name is shirley cavara and work for oakland school district and early education and people come from san joaquin valley and my family is located in the area. the best thing about working here is meeting all the families, and connecting with the kids, and when it finally clicks to them "oh that's what that means". even if it's small steps with some kids it's a great feeling that you have made an accomplishment in their lives that they will remember, so here it started down at ice age and moved to second avenue because it got too big want there was a preschool there and out grew that area and we had three choice in oakland to have the child care center at and the parents chose this one and up in the hills and don't feel like you're in oakland and conducive to our setting and lifestyle as indian people, and a lot of our kids that graduated here are doing community work. they're out there working with their people so we have made a strong impact with kids and you don't think about it. you just do what you do and what comes natural in working with kids and it's the
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
for expanding and creating new visa programs for graduates and that is a goal that isporby the higher education association. including the ciation of higher universities. i also want to take this opportunity to thank senator warrer in because he has supported this immigration also introducing the starp-up agent. it was introduced in 2013 to create a new stem visa that foreign students who graduate with a masters or hpped can receive a green card or -- p.h.d. and stay in this country. to pass legislation that expands opportunities for our stem graduates. if we don't, our national competitive horizon has just narrowed. >> senator? >> thank you, alan let me thank my friends, participants on this panel, the miller center for asking me. let me add my two cents as well on mark kaplan who has been a good friend for a long time. he shows clean living, 96 years olan several years o marriage. i think it is particularly aproper of the miller center to ask me to be here, talk about this topic, since my baurp efforts on fixing the debt and deficit have been so successful. this issue tonight, is tied to debt
. >> educational leaders and staff, more than 85 musicals showcased what they have to offer. john lewis talked to some parents as they shop around to find the best schools for their children. >> it was not a game but education that brought a danger of hundreds of students and parents. >> i have tried to find a school in my community. >> by and large, this -- >> it is our job. >> this is the sixth year for the charter highlighting selective enrollment. contentious issue in chicago. on friday, for more public charter schools were approved for the city. at the same time, closing neighborhood schools run by the district. there is also the possibility of a chartered network sharing space with an under enrolled school. >> we have to be open to considering other options. the quirks charter schools are privately run but they take public money. >> we all need to be working together. we all want to the same thing. we cannot keep kids trapped in the system. >> across town on the west side hundreds of others gathered to talk about reinforcing public schools and said of enhancing the charters. >> i hope th
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